Pune Inc: With over 3 million downloads, this emotional fitness app teaches mindfulness to users around the world

In 2018, long before the Covid-19 pandemic hit, the world was already stressed enough. When Pune-based tech specialist JetSynthesys launched an emotional fitness app called ThinkRight.me that year, it became one of the fastest growing mindfulness platforms in India and was downloaded a million times.

ThinkRight.me includes content curated by Brahma Kumari’s sister Shivani and other masters in the mindfulness and fitness segment on meditation techniques, yoga, affirmations, and positive thinking, among others. Aids, such as three-minute reminders, keep users on track throughout the day. Today, ThinkRight.me has been downloaded by over 3.25 million users in 121 countries. Seeing such success, JetSynthesys is investing more in this space.

In their Kalyani Nagar office in Pune, the team behind ThinkRight.me are now putting the finishing touches to the next level – a new entity suited for the post-pandemic world, called Right Life, which will offer a holistic approach to life, including eat and speak properly. “Our future is to see how we can bring the same conversation as ThinkRight.me to the western world, with the United States being a big target market. We are working to create an ecosystem of mindfulness in the digital medium,” says Rajan Navani , vice president and general manager of JetSynthesys.

When Pune-based tech specialist JetSynthesys launched an emotional fitness app called ThinkRight.me that year, it became one of the fastest growing mindfulness platforms in India and was downloaded a million times.

Earlier this year, ThinkRight.me revealed that a study it conducted among its pan-Indian users showed that around 44% of them started meditating during the pandemic and around 81% between them did it every day.

“There is a lot of uncertainty and fear among people regarding health, economy, family and peer pressure. This affects people’s emotions. We have seen individuals practice meditation and mindfulness as a way to stay calm. As we enter 2021 and 2022, we see that the number of people coming to meditate casually has decreased and those looking at it deeply and more holistically have exploded massively,” says Navani. He adds that the app seeks to turn mindfulness practices into a habitual daily activity because “its effect depends on how often you do a practice.”

The global mindfulness meditation apps market was valued at $1.1 billion in 2021 by Market Data Center “and it is estimated to grow to over $6.8 billion by 2030, at a CAGR of over by 44.5% over the forecast period from 2022 to 2030”. He added that “North America is expected to hold a considerable share of the global mindfulness meditation apps market. Due to increased investment in the research and development process and adoption of solutions in the region, Asia-Pacific is expected to grow at a faster rate during the forecast period.”

ThinkRight.me includes content curated by Brahma Kumari’s sister Shivani and other masters in the mindfulness and fitness segment on meditation techniques, yoga, affirmations, and positive thinking, among others.

Interestingly, interest in mindfulness and meditation mirrors the growth of stress-related conditions and lifestyle-related illnesses across the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the proportion of total deaths worldwide due to chronic or lifestyle-related diseases is expected to rise to 70% and the global burden of disease to 56% by 2030.

The core belief of ThinkRight.me is that if you live more holistically, you are less likely to burn out or get sick. “Over a period of time, these practices shape and change your life as you wish. It was our pathway to a better world,” says Navani.

ThinkRight.me is designed to pay attention, affirmations and other practices to different everyday life situations. Its features include sleep stories for kids; nine-minute capsules on connecting with your inner self when stuck in traffic; breathing techniques to reduce stress and anxiety; a playlist and a range of relaxing music. A user can also set reminders for activities such as singing and journaling. “Most people don’t realize that mindfulness comes from a lot of things, from what you’re exposed to and how you sleep to what you eat. Sometimes your body adds to anxiety and stress. “says Navani.

The app requires a one-time annual subscription, although some content, such as advice from Sister Shivani, is available for free to people who download the app, even without a subscription. As the app prepares to enter the Western market, the effort is focused not only on developing techniques for very different societies, but also on the communication language. “What drives us is that we try to induce behaviors and habits that will change lives,” adds Navani.

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